Why Are You Still Looking For Medical And Dental Insurance?

While I recover from Christmas, I thought I  would re-post this article on the high (and hidden) cost of health care. Until December 31st you can take our discount plan for a spin for only $20! Or you can try our prescription card for free.
banner_benefitbuttonI understand that you want some level of security for your family and believe that a standard insurance plan is the only way to achieve that. I am a mother to 3 and grandmother to 3, and I know how important it is to be covered. But let’s face it, the insurance companies have pulled the wool over our eyes big time.

I calculate that in my working life I have spent anywhere from $3000 to $9000 per year on medical and dental insurance. This does not include my co-pays, which is what you pay out of pocket when you go to the doctor or dentist; as well as the amount you pay for covered prescriptions. Additionally, eye exams and prescription glasses for myself and my son are not fully covered, so that’s a yearly out of pocket of anywhere from $200 to $600 depending on whether or not we indulged in some high end designer glasses.

Not all plans cover every drug so I have at times been surprised at the pharmacy with an unexpected bill for a prescription written by my doctor. Not all procedures are covered either. My gynecologist recommended an outpatient surgical procedure the cost of which put me in debt collection  because my insurance company would not cover it!  The birth of my 3rd child was a C-Section, and although I had both primary and secondary insurance I still ended up with a $3000 bill for anesthesia because the insurance companies only covered 50% of the total cost.

I have a business partner who had a plan through her company that cost $160.00 every two weeks. Her dental plan required a co-pay of $25 and had a deductible of $500. That means that she needed to pay $500.00 out of pocket every year before her insurance company would pay for anything. On top of that there was a limit on what the insurance company would pay for dental procedures. She did not discover all of this until her bridge and partial needed to be replaced and the insurance company said “No” after the work was partially done.

So an individual can pay anywhere from $1000 to $10,000 per year in insurance premiums and still have to come out of pocket when major events occur?

I challenge you to look back over the course of your working life and determine how much you have paid into your insurance versus how much you have gotten out of it. If you discover that you have paid in more than you’ve gotten back, then I have to ask again “Why are you still looking for medical and dental insurance?”

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